The Master Project #1

Robert Kaupelis in his book Experimental Drawing wrote, “To experience and extend both your appreciation of drawing and your ability to delineate form through the meaningful making of marks, for this first problem, I am going to ask you to begin with an old or modern master drawing. I believe that it is important to study, live with, and love master drawings as it is to participate in the actual experience of drawing.

…“Now for several days I’d like you to literally live with this drawing. You are to have an intimate affair with it. Carry it with you at all times. Let it be the first thing you look at in the morning and the last thing you look at before going to bed…

…“Living with a drawing in this fashion can be a most profound experience. Certainly you’ll come to know it better than any other drawing you’ve ever seen.”

I picked a painting to study January 2020, carried it with me every day, researched, and copied it.

Leonardo Da Vinci painted his Renaissance masterwork “Mona Lisa” sometime between 1503 and 1517.

Brush Pen in 9 by 12 inch Starthmore 400 Series sketchbook

Mona Lisa — also know as ‘La Giocanda — is “the best known, the most visited, the most written about, the most sung about, the most parodied work of art in the world.”

Painting by Leonardo da Vinci

The masterpiece, 30 x 20 7/8 inches, is painted on a poplar plank.

Mona Lisa Leonardo da Vinci

Some historians believe Mona Lisa is a self-portrait of Leonardo da Vinci.

Graphite in 9 by 12 inch Starthmore 400 Series sketchbook
Prismacolor Art Stix and Graphite in 9 by 12 inch Starthmore 400 Series sketchbook
Detail of Mona Lisa’s hands, her right hand resting on her left. It is written that Leonardo chose this gesture rather than a wedding ring to depict Lisa as a virtuous woman and faithful wife.
Faber-Castell Soft Brush Pitt artist pen in a Canson XL mix media 5.5 x 8.5 inch sketchbook

The first Sketchbook School Draw With Me featured the Mona Lisa.

https://youtu.be/lnPK-R01NeE

Published by rtsallie

Impasse I could tell you If I wanted to, What makes me What I am. But I don't Really want to – And you don't Give a damn. Langston Hughes

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