September Notes

MAKE TIME TO DRAW!! Nothing is more important.

“Don’t copy. Steal.” See the world around us. Ideas are everywhere. Find ideas and translate them.

Rather than waiting for inspiration to strike (which it rarely does when I’m going about my daily suburban life) I simply focus on finding somewhere comfortable and safe to sit, and then I look for something to sketch.

Any faces you invent are informed by the collective memories of every face you have ever seen.

Objective perception— learning to see what is in front of you as it is, not as you expect it to be.

Drawing is a visual language.

The ability to draw is the result of an application of skill over time. You need dedicated practice.

Take pleasure in the process, and don’t fixate on the outcome.

Try different methods, reject the ones that do not suit you and adapt the ones which do.

A photograph only tells one story about a face — one angle, with subject-to-lens distortions, and the camera’s interpretation of light.

By copying or reinterpretation another artist’s drawing you will learn their marks and gain an insight into that artist’s process.

Practice as often as possible.

Repeat exercises because regular practice helps develop fundamental skills.

Copy to learn. Look hard and copy.

Focus on the processes and not the outcomes.

Commit. Work daily. Focus on improving.

Make lots and lots and lots of bad drawings. Learn from your failure.

Learn to look.

Experiment to find materials you enjoy using and suit your preferred methods.

Trust your eye. Make marks with a purpose. Look for answers by studying your model closely.

Line is a fundamental unit of drawing.

“One lives only to make blunders,” wrote Charles Darwin in 1861.

“Often the work we have not done feels more real in our minds than the pieces we have completed.” – David Bayles.